5 injuries you didn’t think you could get from cycling

1. Runner’s knee

Yes, I said it! You can get runner’s knee from cycling. Contrary to popular belief, this painful problem is not confined to those who hit the pavements in their trainers alone. In fact, there’s a growing number of cyclists that land up on my treatment table that have been plagued with this pesky problem. The problem with cycling (cue “gasp” from our lycra-clad friends) is that the answer may not always be straight forward.

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Football season is on: watch that hamstring!

The Premier league season has just started with a couple of big surprises already. The transfer market is heading for a record this year but the number one priority of every club will be to keep their players in shape, whether they are new recruits or existing ones.

Hamstring injuries in particular will be watched very closely by the clubs’ physios. According to Football Association Medical Research Programme, hamstring strains are the most common injury sustained costing an estimated 90 days and 15 matches missed per club per season. [1]

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“Snow” need to worry about a niggly knee this ski season!

Thinking of warming away the winter blues with a bit of Alpine Sun? Concerned about an injury? Fear not, Vitality Physiotherapy is here to help!

The most common injury sustained on the slopes, is an ACL tear. The Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) is located within the knee joint and connects the tibia (leg bone) to the femur (thigh bone). It is an important stabiliser of the knee joint. The ACL is commonly ruptured as a result of quick decelerations, hyper extension or excessive rotation.

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Jumper’s Knee (patella tendinopathy)

Patella tendinopathy was called jumpers knee due the high incidence amongst athletes involved in jumping sports- such as volleyball, basketball and netball. However this condition may occur in both the sporty and non-sporty population groups.

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ITB friction syndrome (runner’s knee)

ITB Friction syndrome is a very common complaint amongst elite and amateur runners alike. It is caused by the friction of the outside thigh muscle against the lateral aspect of the thigh bone (the lateral aspect of the end of the femur).

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